7. Character Advancement

Real people are not static. They are constantly changed and molded by the experiences of their lives. Characters should be no different.

7.1 Skill Improvement

A player can choose to spend kismet at any time to attempt to increase any one skill. Once the player spends the points he gets to roll 2d10-4. If the result of the roll exceeds the skill's current level, then that skill is raised by one level.

If the skill level is being increased from 0 to 1, then the player must select an area of expertise for that skill. This AoE comes free.

The amount of kismet needed is dependent on how the skill was classified at the time the character was created, as indicated in the table below.

Skill Type Kismet needed

Gifted 3

Normal 4

Feeble 5

It is quite reasonable for a GM to restrict this roll to those skills or attributes that a character has recently used or studied.

Example: Jalice has a skill level 6 at Unlawful Entry(Lock-picking). Because this is one of her gifted skills, the attempt will cost 3 kismet. Her player spends the kismet, rolls the dice, and subtracts 4 from the sum. If the final result is 7 or more, then Jalice's Unlawful Entry(Lock-picking) skill level will increase to 7.

7.2 Gaining Expertise

It is possible that a player will want to add a new area of expertise to an existing skill rather than increase the skill level. This is conceptually and mechanically the opposite of increasing a skill level because the more you know within a skill group, the easier it is to apply that knowledge to a new expertise.

A player can choose to spend kismet at any time to attempt to add an AoE. Once the player spends the points he gets to roll 2d10-4. If the result of the roll is equal to or less than the parent skill's level, then the character gains that Area of Expertise. This is the only time when a low roll is desirable in Dekahedron!

The amount of kismet needed is identical to the amount needed to attempt a skill increase for the parent skill.

It is quite reasonable for a GM to restrict this roll to those skills or attributes that a character has recently used or studied.

Example: Jalice has a skill level 6 at Sneaking(Stealth), and her player wants Jalice to have expertise in Sneaking(Hiding) as well. Because this is one of her gifted skills, the attempt will cost 3 kismet. Her player spends the kismet and rolls the dice. If the sum of the dice is 11 or less, then Jalice's will now have expertise in Sneaking(Stealth, Hiding).

7.3 Skill Decline

There's an old maxim that says, if you don't use it, you lose it. Indeed, without regular practice or use of a skill, a person's ability will decline.

The GM should review each character sheet from time to time, and look for skills that the character hasn't used in quite a while (meaning months or years of game time). For each of these skills, the player should roll 2d10-4. If this roll is less than the skill's current level, then reduce that skill by one level.

A skill should never be reduced lower than 1.

When selecting skills for possible decline, the GM should keep in mind that characters often use skills between adventures, in events too mundane to be played out. The GM should be sympathetic to player explanations of such uses.

Example: Jalice was once shipwrecked for a year on a deserted island. During that time she acquired a skill level of 5 in Survival. Because it's been a few years (game time) since her rescue, and she's been living in cities and towns ever since, the GM tells the player to roll for skill decline. The player rolls 2d10 and subtracts 4 from the sum. Unless the final result comes up as 5 or more, Jalice's Survival skill will drop to 4.

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